the ohana project

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The Ohana Project 

Today, more children survive cancer diagnoses than ever before. But the cancer treatments that save their lives also lead to devastating health problems for the rest of their lives. (1-3) Our goal at MaxLove Project is to ensure that every child fighting cancer not only thrives in treatment and beyond. In order to make a deep and lasting impact on the health and long-term quality of life of childhood cancer survivors, we have teamed up with Ruth McCarty, LAc, (Clinical Director of Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture at CHOC Children’s Hospital) and a team of the most highly regarded pediatric clinicians to design a game-changing integrative and lifestyle medicine program that is targeted and personalized for each child’s and family’s unique health needs. We call it “The Ohana Project.”

Focused on the whole family (“Ohana” in Hawaiian culture), this 3-month program aims to profoundly improve the short- and long-term health of all children fighting cancer by engaging both parents and children alike in tailored integrative therapies (like acupuncture and therapeutic massage), culinary training, small-group facilitated social support, and professional and personalized consultations for nutrition, physical therapy, and psycho-social wellness. Each cohort of Ohana Families will be followed closely in order to hone and develop this revolutionary "Ohana Protocol" for children and families around the world.

Through rigorous research and cutting-edge evidence-based medicine, we aim to develop and spread this comprehensive integrative and lifestyle medicine program that will revolutionize healthcare for all children fighting cancer. Please join us in this “Thrive Revolution”!


Learn more about the unique partners in this pioneering collaboration: Ruth McCarty's Open Mind Modalities and MaxLove Project.


1. Oeffinger KC, et al. Chronic Health Conditions in Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer. New England Journal of Medicine. 2006;355(15):1572-1582. doi:10.1056/NEJMsa060185Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMsa060185.

2. Armstrong GT, et al. Aging and Risk of Severe, Disabling, Life-Threatening, and Fatal Events in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2014;32(12):1218-27. doi:10.1200/JCO.2013.51.1055.

3. Phillips SM, et al. Survivors of Childhood Cancer in the United States: Prevalence and Burden of Morbidity. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention. 2015;24(4):653-663. doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-1418.